Interview with Melissa Rosenberg


Interview with fans on the Glamour Facebook page.

Favorite quote/scene?

I’d have to say the honeymoon scenes. very romantic and playful. lovely to see Edward and Bella having fun.

How to get started as a screenwriter?

I started by taking many many classes in screenwirting, and reading screenplays, watching film and television and analyzing structure. I’m afraid it is HIGHLY competitive, but Hollywood is always hungry for orginal well told stories.

How much of the book is in the movie?

Because we split the one book into two movies, it gave us a lot more room to include as much as possible from the books. Particularly in the first part. We wanted all our favorite scenes to be included – of course everyone has different favorites, but hopefully you’ll be happy. xoM

On cutting down the book

There’s not a screenwriter alive who hasn’t had favorite scenes cut, either for budget reasons in production, or for pacing and storytelling reasons in editing. But honestly, when I saw the various cuts of the movie, I have to say I didn’t miss them, can’t even really remember what they were!

 

Will there be lots of romantic scenes?

There are some AWESOME romantic scenes for Bella and Edward! Seriously. The wedding is really lush and emotional, the honeymoon is truly sexy. Trust me on this one.

Which book did you like the most?

To write anything, one must be in love with whatever one’s writing. So which book did I love writing most? Whichever one I was working on at the time.

How did you translate the wolf-to-wolf monologues?

There was a lot of discussion about the inter-wolf dialogue. In the end, the book pretty much dictated our approach making most of it voice over – but in a stylized way.

Hardest part of writing?

Nothing’s harder than the completely blank page of an original screenplay. So it was a joy to adapt Stephenie’s work, which lends itself beautifully to film storytelling.

Thanks for bringing adults to the forefront

Glad you like it! Breaking Dawn is actually a very adult tale. Our characters are dealing with very grown up issues. Hoping you like it as well.

Do you write to music?

Melissa Rosenberg ‎@mia Music is obviously a HUGE component of our movies. But the story always comes first. I actually don’t write to music. I find it can color my mood, and hence a scene. The only outside influence I want when I’m writing is the book.

What is it like to work with Stephenie Meyer?

Stephenie has been a wonderful collaborator. She, like the Producers, director and studio, gives me feedback on every stage of my process – from outline, to first draft to finished draft. Additionally, whenever I’m stuck on a scene or a storyline, I’ll call or email her to either ask her about a certain character’s backstory, maybe even the color of a certain wolf’s fur, or to just bounce ideas around.

What is Edward like in Breaking Dawn?

Indeed Edward begins BD1 in a much lighter place – and yes, it was a very conscious choice. He’s marrying Bella! He’s the happiest vampire in the world. And then the honeymoon, though not without its… complications, is playful and romantic. But then – things get very dark, very fast, and Edward is at his darkest moment yet.

Have you seen the finished product?

I’ve seen a couple different cuts, and will see the most recent soon. I was sitting in the theater with some other people and began to hear gasps – I was worried for a moment, thinking, oh no, they’re laughing (at a very serious moment). Then I realized, no, theyre crying. Not just crying, sobbing!

Favorite character to write for?

Watching Kristen and Rob embody those characters is a screenwriter’s (and everyone else’s) dream. Their chemistry is amazing, and very rare. But writing for Jacob, tracking his growth, translating his passion, fire and sense of humor – that’s fun.

What was it like to work with Bill Condon?

I’ve worked with many directors over my 20 year career (wow, 20… that just aged me!). And of course, I’ve work with several on the Twi series alone – ALL of whom were truly unique, great experiences (and I’m not just saying that). But I will say that, in my very long career, my collaboration with Bill was the best writer/director collaboration I’ve ever had. I think a lot of that is because he himself is a screenwriter (academy award winning no less!). So he spoke my language – story, stucture, character, theme. He helped me take the characters to new emotional depths… He’s generous, and collaborative. I could go on and on

Biggest challenge turning Breaking Dawn into a movie?
After writing for Dexter for four years, I’ve come to understand that what’s most terrifying isn’t necessariyl what you see, it’s what you DON’T see. The book really informed the way I wrote the scene – all from Bella’s point of view. It conveys her terror, and the terror of Edward and Jacob. And Bill directed it with such intensity, I was mesmerized.

Did the writer’s strike have an effect on the script for Twilight?

Good question. Yes, the strike played a big part in it. I had to write the first Twilight in record time in order to get it to the studio before the strike. As with most things, time equals quality, so the first script suffered from that.

What are you working on next?

I’m very excited about my next movie! I’m doing it with Paramount. It’s based on a book by Pamela Sargent called “Earthseed.” A futuristic sci-fi story with a great female protagonist. It’s available on amazon if you’re curious.

Were you on the set while they filmed?

I was on set for the most important scene in the movie! The wedding! If you look closely, you’ll see me as one of the wedding guests (along with our producer Wyck Godfrey and Stephenie too!)

What is it like to finish up with the Twilight Saga?

The moment I finished the last draft of the last movie – I felt sad (to leave Stephenie’s world… plus I so loved working with this team), free (it was time to move on), worried (what was next?!), excited (to see Bill bring it too life).

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